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====[[How have Historians's perceptions of Native Americans changed?]]====In 1997, Kerwin Lee Klein, among others, observed that a wholesale change had occurred in how historians portrayed Native American history. Previously, historians and ethnographers had focused on “the tragedy of the vanishing Indian.”[1] Many Americans, even those sympathetic to Native Americans, argued that Indians ultimately faced extinction. Even though this argument was undermined by the continued survival of Native Americans, scholars were slow to reject it. The Native American rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s emphasized the persistence of Native Americans. {{Read more|How have Historians's perceptions of Native Americans changed?}}
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====[[The Abraham Lincoln Brigade: the Historiography of the American soldiers in the Spanish American War]]====
During the Spanish Civil War, approximately 2,800 American men and women answered the call from the Communist party to defend the Spanish republic from fascist aggression. These men and women served in the Fifteenth International Brigade and formed the Abraham Lincoln, Washington and MacKenzie-Papineau Battalions. These soldiers’ stories have been controversial, because 80 percent of these volunteers were Communists. {{Read more|The Abraham Lincoln Brigade: the Historiography of the American soldiers in the Spanish American War}}