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Why did Indian Removal cause the Trail of Tears?

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====Why Remove Native Americans?====
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Why was Jackson so committed to removal? Jackson fundamentally believed that Native Americans represented a serious security risk to the United States. Jackson had taken part in the United States campaign against members of the Creek nation who followed Tecumseh in 1814. Tecumseh believed that the United States represented an existential threat to not only Creek tribe, but all Native Americans in the United States. Tecumseh lead a revolt against the United States to push back the advance of American settlers. Tecumseh's revolted was defeated at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814, but Jackson had already decided that Native Americans and US settlers could not live together peaceful. As a result the Tecumseh's defeat, Jackson imposed terms on the entire Creek nation that removed them from their ancestral lands.
Native Americans also held some of the farmlands in the Southeast United States. Several of these tribes had already begun to farm these lands and earnest and make them productive. Both states and settlers wanted to seize these agricultural lands from the Native Americans. The states, such as Georgia, cared little that Native Americans had placed farms on these lands, purchased slaves, or built homes. The tribes did not recognize the states authority over their lands, because they viewed themselves as independent nations. ====Conclusion====To achieve his purpose, Jackson encouraged Congress to adopt the Removal Act of 1830. The Act established a process whereby the President could grant land west of the Mississippi River to Indian tribes that agreed to give up their homelands. As incentives, the law allowed the Indians financial and material assistance to travel to their new locations and start new lives and guaranteed that the Indians would live on their new property under the protection of the United States Government forever. With the Act in place, Jackson and his followers were free to persuade, bribe, and threaten tribes into signing removal treaties and leaving the Southeast.
To achieve his purpose, Jackson encouraged Congress to adopt the Removal Act [[Category:US State Department]] [[Category:Wikis]][[Category:United States History]] [[Category:Colonial American History]] [[Category:18th Century History]] [[Category:Political History]] [[Category:Diplomatic History]]* Select portions of 1830this article are republished from [https://history.state. The Act established a process whereby the President could grant land west gov/| Office of the Mississippi River to Indian tribes that agreed to give up their homelands. As incentivesHistorian, the law allowed the Indians financial and material assistance to travel to their new locations and start new lives and guaranteed that the Indians would live on their new property under the protection of the United States Government foreverDepartment of State]* Article: [https://history. With state.gov/milestones/1750-1775/albany-plan| Indian Treaties and the Removal Act in place, Jackson and his followers were free to persuade, bribe, and threaten tribes into signing removal of 1830https://history.state.gov/milestones/1830-1860/indian-treaties and leaving the Southeast.
====Andrew Jackson and The Removal Act 0f 1830====

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