How Historically Accurate is the Outlaw King?

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Many of us know the story of Braveheart, where William Wallace leads a major rebellion against Edward I in the late 13th century. That movie did not only show the English as repressing the Scots but it also showed another prominent Scottish figure, Robert the Bruce, as being supplicant to the English and enabling their actions until finally he successfully revolts against the English during the reign of Edward II. Many historians had criticized this aspect, where Robert the Bruce was shown in a negative light. In fact, Robert the Bruce, along with many Scots, did for a time accept Edward I as the king, but Robert the Bruce may have actually simply weighted and calculated for an opportune time rather than risk a rebellion that was likely to fail. The Netflix movie Outlaw King tells his story and the making of Scotland that was free of English rule.

The Main Story

The story begins with Robert the Bruce, along with other prominent Scottish nobles, meeting with Edward I to accept him as their king in around 1306. They had already led a rebellion that was unsuccessful, where Edward I, Hammer of the Scots, had earned his nickname by winning against the Scots. Robert still wants to be king, as his family has ancient lineage to the thrown of Scotland, but other claimants exist for the Scottish throne and none of them are in position to attack the English due to their strength and possession of many key areas of Scotland. John Comyn was another Scottish noble who also had perhaps just an equal or maybe stronger claim to the Scottish throne.


Historical Accuracy

Key Characters

Summary

References

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